Lou Rossini

Lou Rossini (1921-2005)

Teams coached: Columbia Lions, NYU Violets, St. Francis Brooklyn Terriers
Columbia record: 117-71 (.622)
NYU record: 185-137 (.575)
St. Francis Brooklyn record: 55-48 (.534)
Overall record: 357-256 (.582)

Career Accomplishments:

Coaching Career (head coach, unless noted):

1975-1979 St. Francis Brooklyn
1958-1971 NYU
1950-1958 Columbia

Lou Rossini Facts

  • Lucio Rossini
  • Born April 24, 1921
  • Died October 21, 2005
  • Hometown: Bronx, New York
  • Alma Mater: Columbia University (BA, 1947 & MA, 1949)
  • After attending Theodore Roosevelt HS in the Bronx, Rossini started his career at St. John’s playing for Joe Lapchick
    • Left to serve in the Army Air Forces during World War II; coached basketball at air bases during his service
    • Returned to New York to finish his education at Columbia, where he played basketball for head coaches Paul Mooney and Gordon Ridings
  • Started his coaching career in 1950, leading the Columbia Lions for eight seasons
    • Reached the 1951 NCAA Tournament in his first season and won 117 games in total
  • Left for NYU, then a Division I program, in 1958, where he coached the Violets for 13 seasons
    • Went to three NCAA Tournaments and three NITs, including a trip to the 1959 NCAA Final Four and Runner-Up finish in the 1966 NIT
    • Resigned in 1971, shortly before NYU dropped basketball
  • Finished his collegiate coaching career with a four-year stint at St. Francis in Brooklyn
  • Later on coached professional teams in Japan, Brazil, Spain and Italy
  • Coached the Puerto Rico national team for 20 years, coaching them in the Olympics in 1964 (4th place) and 1968
    • Won a Silver medal at the 1959 Pan American Games and then a Bronze medal in 1963
  • Served as an adjunct professor at St. John’s from 1986 until his retirement in 1999
  • Along with his wife, Adelia, had two sons and one daughter

Lou Rossini Coaching Tree

  • Raymond Dalmau (Puerto Rico)
  • Arthur Loche (Florida Tech, Vermont)
  • Jack Rohan (Columbia)
  • Satch Sanders (Boston Celtics, Harvard)